Lines and Angles at the Amusement Park

We finished up lines and angles a while back, and I’ve been meaning to share my student’s awesome final quiz.  We had already located angle types in the classroom and taken photos of them.  To reverse the students’ thinking, I gave them a photo and they had to identify examples of the four angle types (right, obtuse, acute, and straight) as well as the three line types (parallel, perpendicular, and intersecting).  I could have done this using a basic worksheet, but instead we went paperless.

educamUsing the Educam app and my Ken-A-Vision Document Camera, I placed a photo of a roller coaster track under the camera and sent it to my students’ iPads.  Their task was to use the pen and text tools to find, trace, and label an example of each of the above items within the one picture.  Some even discovered the arrow tool and used it to be more precise with their labels.  They loved it!  After finishing up the quiz, students saved their photos and uploaded them to Dropbox.  It was fun, engaging, and totally paperless.

Image

Students identified four types of angles and three types of lines.

 

Students annotated the photo using the Educam app.

Students annotated the photo using the Educam app.

 

 

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Angles in the Real World – or at least in my classroom

Geometry is always a bit more fun to teach than other math units.  With the implementation of Common Core – I’ve really had to hustle to get everything in.  This week we worked on identifying angle types.

Students took photos using the iPad of various angles types they found in the classroom.

Students took photos using the iPad of various angles types they found in the classroom.

Students began by using a podcast from the Tennessee Department of Education to note-make.  Given the podcast Identify Acute, Obtuse, and Right Angles, students watched the podcast twice.  First to observe, next to make notes.  Students were given the explicit purpose for note-making: identify the four angle types and their general measurements.  Students also had to be able to tell me what unit we measure angles in.  After confirming the students’ notes, we moved on to real world application of the skill.

Students were tasked with using the iPads to take photos within the classroom of the various angle types.  It turns out that obtuse angles are fairly hard to find in a typical classroom.  After locating the angles, snapping a picture, and checking them in the camera roll students had to create their own instructional videos using their images.

doceriUsing the Doceri app, students uploaded their four images to different slides.  They then narrated and annotated the slides as they recorded their videos.  For my modified math group, students had to simply trace the angle in each photo using the pen tool and then tell the measurement of that type of angle.  The videos came out great.  You can check out a few at these links:

Students created videos annotating their images and narrating each slide.

Students created videos annotating their images and narrating each slide.

M Angles Video

J Angles Video