TenMarks.com – A great math intervention site

tenmarks

I’m in a new school this year, and serve in a few new roles. I couldn’t be more excited, though it’s definitely taking a toll on my free time (and therefore my blogging). One of my new roles is as a Student Intervention Team representative. While I’ve sat on SIT teams for years, I’ve never had to manage folders or be as involved in the intervention process. I’ve been doing a ton of internet reading on effective interventions and wanted to share this free one that has been making a regular appearance in my classroom.

TenMarks.com is a math site made for teachers. Teachers can sign up for a FREE account, input their classes, and assign online tasks based on grade-specific common core standards. Each grade level has activities and assessments geared toward the standards. Simply click on the standard and assign a task. The standards are grouped for easy access and teachers can check out sample questions before building an assignment. There are several reasons why I love TenMarks.com:

DSCN04231. You can put in as many groups as you need. (Read: differentiation for small groups)
2. The app gives you reports on how the kids do on each assignment and stores the scores in a digital gradebook. Teachers can view the final score, how many hints were used, how many instructional videos were viewed, and so on.
3. The questions are a good mix of rigor – basic calculations, but also error analysis and explanation questions in each standard. (Example: Given two student examples, which student got the answer wrong and why?) Also, some questions have more than one correct answer, making children do more analysis than a typical pen and paper assessment.
4. My all time favorite part – if a child doesn’t understand a question, they can click on the video tutorial. Each question has a video explaining how to solve that style of problem. It’s the perfect reteaching component!
5. If they still don’t get the question, they can utilize three extra hints.
6. At the end, students are given a score and then given a chance to go back and fix the questions they got wrong or got partially wrong to improve their score. Who doesn’t love a second chance?

We are using this app at my school as a math intervention for struggling students. The video tutorials give that essential reteaching component. Additionally, since students get individual logins, they can access the site from home and work with parents on the same type of problems. I’m also using it for some on-grade level data collection for my own students.

A few notes: tenmarks app
-The tutorial videos work on any device – including the iPads.
-Kids can access the site from anywhere, but there is a free app to go along with the program that streamlines everything for students.
-There is a Jam Session area where kids can practice skills without doing teacher assignments.
-There is a paid version of this. When teachers get the free version they can only assign tasks from the grade level specific standards. If you upgrade, one of the features is differentiated assignments – allowing teachers to assign any level standard to a class. I did not pay for anything – I’m happily using the free version.

Some of you may have already seen this site. It got sent to me in a mass email that I initially tossed into the trash folder. A big thanks to our reading coach, for telling me to take the time and check it out. Hope some of you find this app useful.

www.TenMarks.com 

Getting Hooked on Augmented Reality

So obviously, I didn’t make my goal of one post a week for the remainder of the school year…Ha!  So I’m going to post all of my iLessons from the end of the year during the summer months.  When teachers actually have time to write and read blog posts!

I spent the spring getting hooked on augmented reality.  For those who haven’t gotten hooked yet – just  try it.  Seriously.  Augmented reality is basically using your iPad to add depth, dimension, sound, or even video to a two dimensional object.  There are some great apps that deal with augmenting reality, but this post is just a quickie to get you started.

Shape QuestIf you’ve never experienced an app that deals with augmented reality, try PBS Kids’ Cyberchase Shape Quest.  First of all it’s free.  Secondly, it’s educational.  Third, it’s awesome!  The app focuses on manipulating shapes to complete a path.  Teachers read: shape identification, shape rotation, and combining shapes to create larger images.

shape questTo begin with, you’ll need to print a game board here.  Then simply open the app, point it at the game board, and follow the directions.  The game comes to life right in front of your eyes.  Users need to help Buzz and Delete save the animals and transport them across the board.  Unfortunately, the path is broken.  Players must pick up the correct pieces and rotate them to fit the path.

Shape Quest   DSCN0384

This app kept my fifth and sixth grade boys busy for weeks!  I did use it, legitimately, one day during a geometry lesson.  The boys were obsessed and used every free moment to beat the levels.  And we’re talking end of the year chaos time… it was awesome.  The “Wow Factor” kept them actively engaged in an educational game, and I couldn’t have been happier.  I’ve also used it with my five year old, but he still requires a bit of hand-over-hand to manipulate the pieces.

If you haven’t given augmented reality a try.  Download this one and give it a go; you won’t regret it.

 

Oh The Snowmanity! A Great App for Teaching Point of View

snowmanityJust a quick post about an app that is currently free.  Oh the Snowmanity! is a super cute story telling about the life of a snowman, through the snowman’s eyes.  The rhyming story is written in an engaging font that bounces around the screen and is narrated by an expressive voice.  It has a few interactions for readers, but the app is mostly about the story.  And the plot is great.  It tells the woes of a snowman’s life in a way that readers have probably never thought about.  From wondering why he’s got buttons but no jacket, to the horrible thing his new friend the dog does, the story is a really great example of how point of view affects the story.

My Pinterest board is currently full of ideas for winter writing.  Oh The Snowmanity would fit beautifully with a writing prompt like “If I lived in a snow globe…” or the prompts about melting snowmen.  We used it with our fifth graders today.  They’ve just done a writing project on perspective and building a snowman from the ground up.  Today we tried a Quick Write and asked the students to write a journal entry from the point of view of the snowman.  We used this app to get them started and give an example of point of view.  I think the biggest hook was the page of the book that talks about the beauty of the snow fall, but then tells how the snowman was freaked out by the bits of flesh falling on him.  It was definitely a light bulb moment for the my kids!  If you are looking for a great way to ease into integrating technology, this would be a great place to start.  Grab it for free before it goes back to full price.

snowmanity2